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Doris Chapman

January 7, 1929 ~ September 5, 2019 (age 90)
Doris Barnes Chapman, 90 of Panama City, FL. Passed away peacefully September 5, 2019. Preceding her in death were her parents, Alton and Lucille Smith Barnes; sons, Lonnie Dale and David (Deborah) Chapman and a brother, Carlos (Tommie) Barnes. She is survived by her daughter, Leslie; son-in-law, Jeffrey Crusan; loyal collie, Sgt. Pepper; her brother, Charles and sister-in-law, Virginia Barnes of Commerce, GA. Doris was born in Birmingham, AL and her family was forced to move extensively during the depression years. As a child, she once danced for Eleanor Roosevelt in Washington, DC with a group of little girls. The all curtsied and had a tea party with the First Lady. She and her young family moved to Sunnyvale, CA in the late 1950’s. She embraced the West Coast lifestyle, studied Judo 7 Yoga for several years and worked as a florist. She later studied at DeAnza College earning her AS degree in physical therapy. Her first job was at Davies Medical Center in San Francisco and later at Mills Memorial Hospital in San Mateo, CA. Doris and her family moved to Panama City Beach in 1980 and she worked as an integral member of the Physical Therapy Team at Bay Medical Center for 17 years and thoroughly loved her patients and co-workers. Doris leaved best friends Gail, Zelda, Gwenn, Anne, Bobbie, Penny, Steve, Rhonda and Andrea, Skywalker and her friends at the Jenks Avenue Church of Christ. A special thank you to Dr. S.A. Daffin and his staff, Shoreline Medical Supply, Covenant Care Hospice, Kathryn, Ruby, Tammy, Linda and Merry. Please donate to the Physical Therapy Assistant Program and Gulf Coast College and Project Hope. Graveside funeral services will take place 10 am Thursday, September 12, 2019 at Midway Cemetery in Adamsville, AL. Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home is assisting the family with arrangements.
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